Stereo recording angle SRA Visualization microphone angle main microphone orchestra angle stereo calculation ORTF EBS NOS XY MS AB Sengpielaudio
 
The often unknown Stereo Recording Angle SRA
of stereo microphone systems (arrays) with two microphones
This topic in German ● Dieses Thema auf Deutsch   DE-flag - sengpielaudio
 
All recording systems with two microphones - Audio calculations -
Stereo Recording Angle SRA, microphone orchestra angle, and reproduction width:
 
Visualization of all Stereo Microphone Systems
Visualization XY Stereo System − Cardioid/Cardioid 90° − Intensity Stereo
Visualization XY Stereo System − Cardioid/Cardioid 120° − Intensity Stereo
Visualization XY Stereo System − Blumlein Eight/Eight 90° − Intensity Stereo
Visualization ORTF Stereo System − Cardioid/Cardioid 110° 17 cm − Equivalence Stereo
Visualization EBS Stereo System − Cardioid/Cardioid 90° 25 cm − Equivalence Stereo
Visualization NOS Stereo System − Cardioid/Cardioid 90° 30 cm − Equivalence Stereo
Visualization AB Stereo System − 30 cm Omni/Omni 0° − Time-of-Arrival Stereo
Visualization AB Stereo System − 60 cm Omni/Omni 0° − Time-of-Arrival Stereo
Visualization AB Stereo System − 120 cm Omni/Omni 0° − Time-of-Arrival Stereo
Visualization AB Stereo System − Tony Faulkner − Eight/Eight 0° - Time-of-Arrival Stereo
Visualization AB Stereo System − Time-of-Arrival Stereo with Omnis
Visualization XY Stereo System − Intensity Stereo (Level Difference Stereo) with Cardioids
Stereo Recording Angle = SRA calculation Δ L and Δ t for stereo microphone arrays − flash
 
Calculator (flash): The Stereo Recording Angle SRA of the stereo microphone system.
This application can help you to find a microphone arrangement for stereo recording. The calculation is based on the theory of the "stereo recording angle" SRA of a microphone setup with the formulas of Eberhard Sengpiel: "Calculation of the direction of phantom source images by Interchannel Level Difference Δ L and Interchannel Time Difference Δ t: http://www.sengpielaudio.com/calculator-localisationcurves.htm
The Stereo Recording Angle SRA:
The SRA is not the angle between the microphone axes, but an invisible angle, that gives you information about your stereo image. It tells you how "wide" the recording will sound. Every acoustic sources that are outside of the SRA will be located full at "L" or "R". So a smaller SRA will give you a wider stereo image. Everything inside of the SRA will find a place between the left and the right speaker.
A stereo image is always due to time-od-arrival and / or level differences between the left and the right channel.
You can adjust the ratio by dragging the faders on the right side.
If you want an ensemble (or any other acoustic source) to fill out the full stereo image of your recording, this is a way to use it:
1. Find a position in the room where it sounds good. Place your microphones there.
2. Estimate an angle from this point that borders your ensemble.
3. Drag the SRA of the calculator (not the microphone angle α) to the value of your estimated angle.
4. Choose the polar pattern of your microphones and adjust the ratio of time and level difference the way you want.
5. Arrange your microphones with the spacing between the capsules (microphone base d ) and the angle between the microphones (axle angle α) calculated by the calculator.
You can also calculate the SRA of a given microphone setup. Just click on the field for "spacing" or "microphone angle" and fill in the values numerically.
 
Calculation of the direction of phantom source image − interchannel signals
Equations for the level difference and time difference localisation curve
Phantom source image − Simonsen and Sengpiel for comparison − 1
Phantom source image − Wittek/Theile and Sengpiel for comparison − 2
Direction of phantom image b1 in dependence of interchannel level difference Δ L
Direction of phantom image b2 in dependence of interchannel time difference Δ t
Well-known stereo microphone systems and their angles
Calculation of the extension angle of the orchestra (orchestra angle)
Direct field D (Free field) and Reverberant field R (Diffuse field)
Vowel diagram − The first two formant frequencies as triangle
The human perception of loudness − Loudness factor gain ratio
Questions to sound waves and the amplitudes − The right answers
Surprise – Sound does not come from the strings
 
Tony Faulkner: A Phased Array 6 − Review
Tony Faulkner: A Phased Array 1 − Introduction
Tony Faulkner: A Phased Array 2 − Article page 1
Tony Faulkner: A Phased Array 3 − Article page 2
Tony Faulkner: A Phased Array 4 − Article page 3
 
"Live End − Dead End" − Thoughts about the Reflexion Filter
"Kaotica Eyeball" − Singing into a bucket
"Room modes and vibrations of strings compared" − Standing waves
Pressure gradient and the Phase (M/S) − omni-directional
Surprise – Sound does not come from the strings
Two Different Boundary MicrophoneTypes - Crown PZM
 
"Acoustic Knowledge" − English 1 Questions   "Acoustic Knowledge"  − English 1 Answers
"Acoustic Knowledge" English 2 Questions   "Acoustic Knowledge" English 2 Answers
"Loudspeaker and Ear Signals" − English Questions   "Signals" − English Answers
"Tonmeister Test" 68 − English Questions   "Tonmeister Test" 68 − English Answers
"Tonmeister Test" 73 − English Questions   "Tonmeister Test" 73 − English Answers
"Basics of Sound" 01 − English Questions   "Basics of Sound" 01 − English Answers
"Test for Quick Audio Men" 01 − English Questions    − English Answers 01
"Test for Quick Audio Men" 02 − English Questions    − English Answers 02
"Test for Quick Audio Men" 03 − English Questions    − English Answers 03
"Test for Quick Audio Men" 04 − English Questions    − English Answers 04
"Sound field and Sound energy quantities" − English Questions  − English Answers
 
zurück zurück weiter weiter Startseite start